Hurricane Prevention

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Friday, May 24, 2013

New Blog Address - HURRICANEFOLLOWER.COM



A premium domain name has been acquired for this Hurricane blog HURRICANEPREVENTION.NET.

The new address to follow for complete updates for the 2013 Hurricane Season which begins on 

June 1, 2013 is:



The new blog is currently in construction at this time but should be running and fully functional by 

June 1, 2013



SEE YOU THERE!

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Oklahoma City Hurricane Pictures

Pictures do not lie. What you are about to view are pictures taken of the tornado that went through Moore Oklahoma last week. The pictures look like they were taken in Bosnia or some war zone. But the fact is, they are taken from the heartland of America. Words cannot describe how the misplaced people from Moore Oklahoma now feel. In a matter of seconds, mother nature stripped each family from everything they own, except the shirt off of their back. No more home, no car, no more personal belongings, no more furniture, no more food. In some cases, families were torn apart. Loved ones were killed. Families lost children. Other children lost parents. Family pets are gone. The neighborhood that you may have grown up in is just totally gone.  Good families are now totally heartbroken. The sad part of all of this would be that this destruction, which should top 1 billion dollars is just the beginning of a long, hot, and destructive summer, full of tornadoes, and hurricanes that will be aiming at North America starting on June 1, 2013, which is the start of the Hurricane season.


























A massive tornado moves past homes in Moore, Oklahoma, on Monday, May 20, 2013. A tornado as much as a mile (1.6 kilometers) wide with winds up to 200 mph (320 kph) roared through the Oklahoma City suburbs, flattening entire neighborhoods, setting buildings on fire and landing a direct blow on an 
elementary school. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)





                            
 This aerial photo shows the remains of homes hit by a massive tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, on May 20,
 2013. (AP Photo/Steve Gooch)



An aerial photo of a neighborhood hit by a massive tornado in Moore, on May 20, 2013. (AP Photo/Steve
Gooch)



 A woman carries a child through a field near the collapsed Plaza Towers Elementary School in Moore, on May 20, 2013. The relationship between the woman and the child was not immediately known. (AP Photo
Sue Ogrocki)


 An aerial photo showing damage to Plaza Towers Elementary School after it was hit by a massive tornado in Moore, on May 20, 2013. Rescue workers and a helicopter can be seen at lower right. (AP
Photo/Steve Gooch)


 Rescue workers dig through the rubble of a collapsed wall at the Plaza Tower Elementary School to free
trapped students in Moore, on May 20, 2013. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)



A child is pulled from the rubble of the Plaza Towers Elementary School in Moore, and passed along to
rescuers, on May 20, 2013. (AP Photo Sue Ogrocki)



 A child is carried from the rubble of the Plaza Towers Elementary School, on May 20, 2013. (AP
Photo/Sue Ogrocki


 A boy is pulled from beneath a collapsed wall at the Plaza Towers Elementary School, on May 20, 2013.
(AP Photo/ Sue Ogrocki)


 A woman is pulled out from under tornado debris at the Plaza Towers School in Moore, Oklahoma, on
May 20, 2013. (AP Photo Sue Ogrocki)


 A woman walks through what remains of a bowling alley, and other buildings, after a huge tornado struck
Moore, near Oklahoma City, on May 20, 2013. (Reuters/Richard Rowe)



A dead dog lies covered in the driveway of a home after a tornado struck Moore, on May 20, 2013.
(Reuters/Gene Blevins)



 People walk through a damaged area near the Moore Warren Theater after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 20, 2013. (Brett Deering/Getty Images)


 An aerial photo shows the remains of tornado-damaged houses in Moore, on May 20, 2013. A tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburbs Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods, setting buildings on fire and landing a direct blow on an elementary school. (AP Photo/Steve Gooch)



Piles of debris and mangled trees remain after a powerful tornado ripped through the area, on May 20,
2013. (Brett Deering/Getty Images)



 Flipped vehicles are piled up outside the heavily damaged Moore Medical Center on May 20, 2013.
(Brett Deering/Getty Images)



This aerial photo shows the remains of homes, after being flattened by a massive tornado in Moore,
Oklahoma, on May 20, 2013. (AP Photo/Steve Gooch)



 A battered, muddy vehicle destroyed by a huge tornado sits on a street in Moore, on May 20, 2013.
(Reuters/Richard Rowe)



Destroyed automobiles and debris block the entrance to a commercial building after a huge tornado
struck Moore, on May 20, 2013. Broken-off branches can be seen jutting out of the building's facade.
(Reuters/Richard Rowe)



 People look at the damage in the parking lot of Moore Hospital after a tornado struck Moore, on May
20, 2013. (Reuters/Gene Blevins)


 The hood of car is wedged into the front window of the Moore Medical Center after a powerful tornado
ripped through the area on May 20, 2013. (Brett Deering/Getty Images)


 A church steeple lies on the ground after it was toppled by a huge tornado which struck near Oklahoma City, on May 20, 2013. (Reuters/Richard Rowe)



An aerial photo of a section of Moore struck by the massive tornado on May 20, 2013. (AP Photo/Steve
Gooch)



 An aerial photo of a neighborhood in Moore destroyed by the massive tornado on May 20, 2013.


 A man and two children walk through debris after a huge tornado struck Moore, on May 20, 2013.
(Reuters/Richard Rowe)


 A vehicle lies upside down in the road after a powerful tornado ripped through the area on May 20,
2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. (Brett Deering/Getty Images)


 Carlos and Kim Caudillo stand in the debris of their home after a powerful tornado ripped through Moore,
Oklahoma on May 20, 2013. (Brett Deering/Getty Images)


  Sunrise, on Tuesday, May 21, 2013, an American flag blows in the wind atop the rubble of a destroyed
home in Moore, Oklahoma. (AP Photo/Brennan
Linsley)


 A destroyed police car sits among the debris of tornado-ravaged homes in Moore, on May 21, 2013.
(AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)


 Abby Madi (left) and Peterson Zatterlee comforts Zaterlee's dog Rippy, after a tornado struck Moore, on
May 20, 2013. (Reuters/Gene Blevins)


 A heavily-battered truck, in a field near the Moore Medical Center, background, after a tornado moves
through Moore, Oklahoma, on May 20, 2013. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)


 Headstones stand amid debris in the Moore Cemetery after it was damaged by a tornado May 21,
2013. (Brett Deering/Getty Images)



Lea Bessinger salvages a picture of Jesus as she and her son Josh Bessinger sort through the rubble of the
elder Bessinger's tornado-ravaged home in Moore, on May 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)



 Piles of debris and cars lie around a home destroyed by a tornado in Moore, on May 21, 2013. (Brett
Deering/Getty Images)


 Residents pass a destroyed car as they walk through a tornado-ravaged neighborhood of Moore,
Oklahoma, on May 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)


 

 A fire burns in the Tower Plaza Addition in Moore, Oklahoma, following a tornado, on May 20, 2013.
(AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

                       

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

UPDATE - Moore Oklahoma Tornado CAT EF5

It now has been confirmed that the tornado that traveled through Moore Oklahoma now is being recorded as an EF5 tornado. The good news is that the statement of confirmed dead, which was reported at 51, now actually stands at 24, but included 9 children. Some of the figures that were reported yesterday were incorrect. With that said, that means that the winds speed of this storm reached above 200 MPH. Many homes were stripped down to their foundations. Many people lost everything they own, and consider themselves lucky for coming out of this with their lives. Others, like the children of a school that was leveled during the storm, never made it out alive. The following is a video from Moore Oklahoma.


President Obama made the following formal statements of support by the Federal government today were directed at the cities of Moore and NewCastle Oklahoma, and people from just about everywhere across the country are merging to the tornado stricken city to assist with the search, rescue and cleanup.

 State Dining Room 10:08 A.M. EDT THE PRESIDENT: Good morning, everybody. As we all know by now, a series of storms swept across the Plains yesterday, and one of the most destructive tornadoes in history sliced through the towns of Newcastle and Moore, Oklahoma.
  In an instant, neighborhoods were destroyed. Dozens of people lost their lives. Many more were injured. And among the victims were young children, trying to take shelter in the safest place they knew -- their school. So our prayers are with the people of Oklahoma today. Our gratitude is with the teachers who gave their all to shield their children; with the neighbors, first responders, and emergency personnel who raced to help as soon as the tornado passed; and with all of those who, as darkness fell, searched for survivors through the night.
 As a nation, our full focus right now is on the urgent work of rescue, and the hard work of recovery and rebuilding that lies ahead. Yesterday, I spoke with Governor Fallin to make it clear to Oklahomans that they would have all the resources that they need at their disposal. Last night, I issued a disaster declaration to expedite those resources, to support the Governor’s team in the immediate response, and to offer direct assistance to folks who have suffered loss. I also just spoke with Mayor Lewis of Moore, Oklahoma, to ensure that he’s getting everything that he needs. I've met with Secretary Napolitano this morning and my Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Advisor, Lisa Monaco, to underscore that point that Oklahoma needs to get everything that it needs right away. The FEMA Administrator, Craig Fugate, is on his way to Oklahoma as we speak. FEMA staff was first deployed to Oklahoma’s Emergency Operations Center on Sunday, as the state already was facing down the first wave of deadly tornadoes.
 Yesterday, FEMA activated Urban Search and Rescue Teams from Texas, Nebraska, and Tennessee to assist in the ongoing search and rescue efforts, and a mobile response unit to boost communications and logistical support. So the people of Moore should know that their country will remain on the ground, there for them, beside them as long as it takes. For there are homes and schools to rebuild, businesses and hospitals to reopen, there are parents to console, first responders to comfort, and, of course, frightened children who will need our continued love and attention.
 There are empty spaces where there used to be living rooms, and bedrooms, and classrooms, and, in time, we’re going to need to refill those spaces with love and laughter and community. We don’t yet know the full extent of the damage from this week’s storm. We don't know both the human and economic losses that may have occurred. We know that severe rumbling of weather, bad weather, through much of the country still continues, and we're also preparing for a hurricane season that begins next week. But if there is hope to hold on to, not just in Oklahoma but around the country, it's the knowledge that the good people there and in Oklahoma are better prepared for this type of storm than most. And what they can be certain of is that Americans from every corner of this country will be right there with them, opening our homes, our hearts to those in need. Because we're a nation that stands with our fellow citizens as long as it takes. We've seen that spirit in Joplin, in Tuscaloosa; we saw that spirit in Boston and Breezy Point. And that’s what the people of Oklahoma are going to need from us right now.
 For those of you who want to help, you can go online right now to the American Red Cross, which is already on the ground in Moore. Already we've seen the University of Oklahoma announce that it will provide housing for displaced families. We've seen local churches and companies open their doors and their wallets. And last night, the people of Joplin dispatched a team to help the people of Moore. So for all those who’ve been affected, we recognize that you face a long road ahead. In some cases, there will be enormous grief that has to be absorbed, but you will not travel that path alone. Your country will travel it with you, fueled by our faith in the Almighty and our faith in one another. So our prayers are with the people of Oklahoma today. And we will back up those prayers with deeds for as long as it takes. Thank you very much. END 10:13 A.M. EDT

Monday, May 20, 2013

A Tornado Levels Moore Oklahoma


Serious weather has introduced itself this storm season as violent that it could with evidence of what a localized Category EF4 tornado ( 166 to 200 MPH) centered in Moore Oklahoma could only do. In 1999, this city had an EF5 tornado that cleaned the slabs of every home in the path. Today, the tornado grew to a mile wide and was on the ground for about 20 miles. The confirmed dead is at 51 lives, with 20 of them children and no doubt the death toll will rise. Approximately 150 others were injured. Two local schools filled with students were in the path of the tornado. The storm was only on the ground between 20 and 30 minutes. Again the difference between a tornado and a hurricane are very strikingly different, but the end result from direct contact from either storm can be deadly.
Children in a local grade school were told to go into the inner most hallway and hug the wall. Fire drills in all schools in Oklahoma are quite regular and the students did what they were told. But the storm was so strong, with winds over 200 MPH that the schools were compromised and several children had perished, and still others are still buried at this time under the rubble.



The local broadcast community, television and TV stations were pleading the residents to leave their homes and drive away from the hurricane. The area of concern was heavily populated. So many lives in the city of Moore Oklahoma have been affected. The loss for homes directly in the path of this storm is total.
So this is what a storm with 200 MPH winds can do.
No imagine that a storm cell, starting out as a rainstorm, turning in a tropical storm with winds growing, and the entire length of the Atlantic Ocean from the coast of Africa to the cost of the United States to intensify, thus the reason why it is so important to swallow your pride and when such a storm threatens, the only response is to leave.
The people in Moore Oklahoma had very little time to evacuate, although ample warning to move out of the way for the majority of people affected was given. Some did not get to evacuate and many have lost their lives. But with a hurricane and such a large advance notice about the storm before it arrives, yet unfortunately many people refuse to leave their homes, putting their lives and the lives of their loved ones in danger.
In Moore Oklahoma  there are 3 hospitals, and one of the 3 took a direct hit of the storm, which was the most northern hospital in the city.
In Norman Oklahoma, there are two hospitals that took an overload of patients as a result to the tornado. Last week, over a dozen tornadoes touched down in the state of Texas. Will all that seems to be going on in local communities, the hurricane weather and tropical storms are just at the beginning of the season.



Sunday, May 19, 2013

2012 Atlantic hurricane Statistics

Saffir–Simpson hurricane scale
TDTSC1C2C3C4C5

2012 North Atlantic tropical cyclone statistics
Storm
name
Dates activeStorm category
at peak intensity
Max 1-min
wind
mph (km/h)
Min.
press.
(mbar)
Areas affectedDamage
(millions
USD)
Deaths

AlbertoMay 19 – May 22Tropical storm60 (95)995Southeastern United StatesNoneNone
BerylMay 26 – May 30Tropical storm70 (110)992CubaThe BahamasSoutheastern United States (Florida)0.1481 (2)
ChrisJune 18 – June 22Category 1 hurricane85 (140)974BermudaAtlantic CanadaNoneNone
DebbyJune 23 – June 27 Tropical storm65 (100)990CubaCentral AmericaSoutheastern United States (Florida), Bermuda308.77 (3)
ErnestoAugust 1 – August 10Category 2 hurricane100 (160)973Windward IslandsJamaicaCentral AmericaMexico (Yucatán Peninsula)1747 (5)
FlorenceAugust 3 – August 6Tropical storm60 (95)1002Cape VerdeNoneNone
HeleneAugust 9 – August 18Tropical storm45 (75)1004Windward IslandsTrinidad and TobagoCentral AmericaMexico>172
GordonAugust 15 – August 20Category 2 hurricane110 (175)965AzoresMinimalNone
IsaacAugust 21 – September 1Category 1 hurricane80 (130)965Leeward IslandsPuerto RicoHispaniola (Haiti), CubaThe BahamasSoutheastern United States (Louisiana),Midwestern United States2,39034 (7)
JoyceAugust 22 – August 24Tropical storm40 (65)1006NoneNoneNone
KirkAugust 28 – September 2Category 2 hurricane105 (165)970NoneNoneNone
LeslieAugust 30 – September 11Category 1 hurricane80 (130)968Leeward IslandsBermudaAtlantic CanadaIcelandScotlandUnknownNone
MichaelSeptember 3 – September 11Category 3 hurricane115 (185)964NoneNoneNone
NadineSeptember 10 – October 3Category 1 hurricane90 (150)978AzoresMinimalNone
OscarOctober 3 – October 5Tropical storm50 (85)994NoneNoneNone
PattyOctober 11 – October 13Tropical storm45 (75)1005The BahamasNoneNone
RafaelOctober 12 – October 17Category 1 hurricane90 (150)969Leeward IslandsWindward IslandsBermudaAtlantic Canada (Newfoundland)>21
SandyOctober 22 – October 29 Category 3 hurricane115 (185)940JamaicaCubaHispaniolaThe BahamasSoutheastern United StatesBermudaMid-Atlantic States (New Jersey), New EnglandEast North Central StatesSouthern OntarioQuebec>75,000147 (138)
TonyOctober 22 – October 25Tropical storm50 (85)1000NoneNoneNone
Season Aggregates
19 cyclonesMay 19 – October 29 115 (185)940>77,892199 (155)

See also [edit]

2012 Pacific Hurricane Statistics

Saffir–Simpson hurricane scale
TDTSC1C2C3C4C5

2012 Pacific hurricane statistics
Storm
name
Dates activeStorm category
at peak intensity
Max 1-min
wind
mph (km/h)
Min.
press.
(mbar)
Areas affectedDamage
(millions
USD)
Deaths

AlettaMay 14 – May 19Tropical storm50 (85)1000NoneNoneNone
BudMay 20 – May 26Category 3 hurricane115 (185)961Western MexicoMinimalNone
CarlottaJune 14 – June 16Category 2 hurricane110 (175)973Southern Mexico (Oaxaca)107.77
DanielJuly 4 – July 12Category 3 hurricane115 (185)961NoneNoneNone
EmiliaJuly 7 – July 15Category 4 hurricane140 (220)945NoneNoneNone
FabioJuly 12 – July 18Category 2 hurricane110 (175)966Baja California PeninsulaWestern United StatesNoneNone
GilmaAugust 7 – August 11Category 1 hurricane80 (130)984NoneNoneNone
HectorAugust 11 – August 16Tropical storm50 (85)995Western Mexico, Baja California PeninsulaMinimalNone
IleanaAugust 27 – September 2Category 1 hurricane85 (140)978NoneNoneNone
JohnSeptember 2 – September 4Tropical storm45 (75)1000Baja California Peninsula, CaliforniaMinimalNone
KristySeptember 12 – September 17Tropical storm60 (95)998NoneMinimalNone
LaneSeptember 15 – September 19Category 1 hurricane85 (130)985NoneNoneNone
MiriamSeptember 22 – September 27Category 3 hurricane120 (195)959NoneNoneNone
NormanSeptember 28 – September 29Tropical storm50 (85)997Baja California Peninsula, Western Mexico (Sinaloa), TexasMinimal1
OliviaOctober 6 – October 8Tropical storm60 (95)997NoneNoneNone
PaulOctober 13 – October 17Category 3 hurricane120 (195)959Baja California Peninsula15.5None
RosaOctober 30 – November 3Tropical storm50 (85)1001NoneNoneNone
Season Aggregates
17 cyclonesMay 14 – November 3 140 (220)945123.28